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  • What has happened to LEICA ?

    I agree with the points raised and would like to share……...http://jorgetorralba.com/2014/11/22/...-is-your-mojo/

  • #2
    Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

    I totally agree with the writer. I'm an avid Leica buff. I have most of the M series both film and digital as well as the R9 and the DMR back. I buy every new series that they launch. But lately I have refused to buy any of the Leica's because they do not have any improvements, just as the author said they are just fashion statements. They just engrave 100 years on the bodies and expect to find buyers who want to own these 'collectors' items. I find no justification for spending good money on these collectors' items. So all my Leica's are nicely stored in the dry boxes and I don't know what I'll do with them in the future.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

      From a practical and utility viewpoint, what can a Leica do which many of the Japanese brand names are not capable of doing? I cannot think of any.
      Then ask what can a high-end Canon, Nikon , Pentax or Sony do which Leica cannot? I can think of many.

      And do the mirrorless and m4/3 options offer any less features than a Leica? Hardly. In fact, the reverse is the norm.

      Leica has always catered for a niche market. As long as there are several high-heeled rollers out there, they know they can sell their products.
      And they tapped on all those offering with fanciful special and limited editions only available in their boutiques which do not offer one single feature more practical than others for all purposes.

      Yes, when you have the financial muscle, go ahead and be their gearhead. But for the greenbacks you need to splash out even for just the body only, I can have my option to include a couple of lenses stretching from extreme wide to telephotos under any of the other established brands. And you bet I can shoot anything from astrophotography to extreme sports to my heart's content. Try that with Leica.

      Then again, Leica never meant to be rub shoulders with the crowd. They tried to excel in their own ways to stand above heads and shoulders. For the name. For that sense of exclusivity and privilege. At that price level, I'd rather plant my feet firmly on the ground. Thanks, but no thanks.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

        Owning a Leica does seem to give the owner a sense of "being there". Thats about it. The technical improvements on currently launched models do seem lacking though the finesse of the product actually reflect the "cosmetic" improvements made to them.

        I do own the smaller compact d-lux & c-lux of which I use for holidays and other stuffs which doesn't involved work. Noticed when I bring out the camera, the other photographers who see what I use will have "awe" written all over their faces.

        Leica knows this well and perhaps this is the way they are milking the name to the max?
        Saya Ipoh Mali...jom pergi tengok jetfynn.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

          I couldn't agree more with the writer.......Like Noordin, I have been a Leicaphile for 30 years. And unlike Noordin, I am not a Digital Leica Rangefinder collector. But I do have both the R and M system.

          As a diehard user, I 've found that the rangefinder mechanism for the purpose of focussing is very accurate, but slow. And I don't think the mechanism can ever be automated ( auto focussing ) because it has reached its pinnacle of mechanical finesse. Furthermore, the M lenses are all manually rangefinder coupled. I suspect the Leica T is a new 'prototype' mirror less camera system which uses cheaper interchangeable lenses (Made in Japan) and Auto focus via a detachable EVF. The irony is that Leica patented the "Auto Focusing" in early '70's and Konica and Minolta ( Leica's Japanese technology counterpart in 60's, 70's ......) incorporated it and perfected by Nikon and Canon then on. Sony took over the imaging division of Minolta and is now at the forefront of sensor technology.

          Initially, I would use A7r and A7s as alternative camera to the M when traveling. But, I've grown to like the cameras more and more when it comes to portability and capability. At this juncture, the Leica T is trailing far behind Fuji, Sony and also Olympus in the mirror less realm.

          Click image for larger version

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          A portrait of an old Malay Comedian in the '60's, Mat Sentol. Taken with Sony A7s with Zeiss-Sony Fe 55 1.8
          Last edited by khaireen; 06-02-2015, 09:55 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

            On a nostalgia note. The heydays of Leica were in the 1950s with the classic M3. In the 1970s the SL2 had some limited success. The R series never really get a firm bite when there were other plentiful SLRs from the Japanese counterparts like the Nikon F3, F4 and Canon 1n, 1v during that film era. It culminated with the M6 which is still generally considered as the most popular rangefinder, bar none.

            Then they launched the M8. It was hoopla for all the M users as they can use their compatible M lenses on a first rangefinder available. The hype and positive response naturally led to the M9 and M9P. The dominant features was the repacement of the Kodak-based CCD sensor with a full-frame CMOS sensor in tandem with current production technology.

            Leica would lose out when their M-mount series of excellent lenses can now be used on several other digicams with adapters. These lenses have always been on the forefront to support their brand name. Not their M9 or M240. And despite the premium cost at this high-end level, the earlier M8 and M9 are not without their quirks and setbacks with stained LCD, cracked sensors and corrosion.

            The rangefinder appeal is likely to lose ground in the years ahead. While it has its own unique and inherent attraction, I do not foresee new, young and aspiring photgraphers to stand on queue at their stores or boutiques to acquire this 'prestigious' product. For one, it's too expensive by a long shot. And it's not making photgraphy any easier to bring out the fun of shooting.

            Where Leica is heading is for their boardroom to decide. I am keeping my IIIf DA, M3, M6 and SL2 whichever direction they may take. That's nostalgia in every sense of the word.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by khaireen View Post
              A portrait of an old Malay Comedian in the '60's, Mat Sentol.
              long time no see!

              If I could afford a Leica lens, what would it be?

              Steve Huff praises the 50 f/0.95... but that requires insane amount of bills... maybe the 50 cron
              Pentax bagus! :-)

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                Originally posted by khaireen View Post
                I couldn't agree more with the writer.......Like Noordin, I have been a Leicaphile for 30 years. And unlike Noordin, I am not a Digital Leica Rangefinder collector. But I do have both the R and M system.

                As a diehard user, I 've found that the rangefinder mechanism for the purpose of focussing is very accurate, but slow. And I don't think the mechanism can ever be automated ( auto focussing ) because it has reached its pinnacle of mechanical finesse. Furthermore, the M lenses are all manually rangefinder coupled. I suspect the Leica T is a new 'prototype' mirror less camera system which uses cheaper interchangeable lenses (Made in Japan) and Auto focus via a detachable EVF. The irony is that Leica patented the "Auto Focusing" in early '70's and Konica and Minolta ( Leica's Japanese technology counterpart in 60's, 70's ......) incorporated it and perfected by Nikon and Canon then on. Sony took over the imaging division of Minolta and is now at the forefront of sensor technology.

                Initially, I would use A7r and A7s as alternative camera to the M when traveling. But, I've grown to like the cameras more and more when it comes to portability and capability. At this juncture, the Leica T is trailing far behind Fuji, Sony and also Olympus in the mirror less realm.

                [ATTACH]308997[/ATTACH]
                A portrait of an old Malay Comedian in the '60's, Mat Sentol. Taken with Sony A7s with Zeiss-Sony Fe 55 1.8
                Super!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                  This Forbes article may explain why the M has largely become "jewelry" like a watch.

                  http://www.forbes.com/sites/marcbabe...its-own-terms/

                  In a nutshell Leica's core customer for range finders namely well paid photojournalists is quickly dissipating.

                  With smartphones eating into the dedicated still camera market all brands must go up market.

                  Fortunately with Leica their brand is up market already.

                  SLR has Nikon/Canon lording things over. With Pentax and Sony fighting over scraps.

                  Leica is present in the mirrorless and point and shoots.

                  So what is "virgin territory"?

                  Medium format.

                  The players are Hassleblad, Phase One, Mamiya and recently, Pentax.

                  Other than Pentax these companies have largely not innovated much, if it all.

                  Per Leica this is a market of about 6,000 units a year. They claim to have 20% from 2010-20013. Dunno what it is now though.

                  The advantage of Leica is that there is no legacy technology to compromise their tech. They have a clean slate to start from.

                  Another advantage is if you have lenses from a V, P67, M645, Contax 645 or Hassleblad H you can still use em with an adapter.
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/alabang/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                    Originally posted by summersnow View Post
                    long time no see!

                    If I could afford a Leica lens, what would it be?

                    Steve Huff praises the 50 f/0.95... but that requires insane amount of bills... maybe the 50 cron
                    Ming Thein used to have a list on his website, I can't find the link but I would suggest you dig it up and follow his info instead of living room, kitchen and back yard photographer Steve Huff.
                    [URL="http://www.loveanda35.com"]Portfolio / Blog / Photography Course[/URL] | [URL="http://instagram.com/loveanda35#"]Instagram[/URL] | [URL="https://twitter.com/loveanda35"]Twitter[/URL]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                      50 AA's my ticket.
                      http://www.flickr.com/photos/alabang/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                        Originally posted by dolina View Post
                        50 AA's my ticket.
                        Ticket for what?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                          Alot of good points! You shud'ave mentioned the sixties tho, when Nikon F (and Photomic lightmeter prism) took over; the m3 and m2s were sitting on the shelves (in shops and/or with photogs)

                          Originally posted by apophoto View Post
                          On a nostalgia note. The heydays of Leica were in the 1950s with the classic M3. In the 1970s the SL2 had some limited success. The R series never really get a firm bite when there were other plentiful SLRs from the Japanese counterparts like the Nikon F3, F4 and Canon 1n, 1v during that film era. It culminated with the M6 which is still generally considered as the most popular rangefinder, bar none.

                          Then they launched the M8. It was hoopla for all the M users as they can use their compatible M lenses on a first rangefinder available. The hype and positive response naturally led to the M9 and M9P. The dominant features was the repacement of the Kodak-based CCD sensor with a full-frame CMOS sensor in tandem with current production technology.

                          Leica would lose out when their M-mount series of excellent lenses can now be used on several other digicams with adapters. These lenses have always been on the forefront to support their brand name. Not their M9 or M240. And despite the premium cost at this high-end level, the earlier M8 and M9 are not without their quirks and setbacks with stained LCD, cracked sensors and corrosion.

                          The rangefinder appeal is likely to lose ground in the years ahead. While it has its own unique and inherent attraction, I do not foresee new, young and aspiring photgraphers to stand on queue at their stores or boutiques to acquire this 'prestigious' product. For one, it's too expensive by a long shot. And it's not making photgraphy any easier to bring out the fun of shooting.

                          Where Leica is heading is for their boardroom to decide. I am keeping my IIIf DA, M3, M6 and SL2 whichever direction they may take. That's nostalgia in every sense of the word.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                            hmmm… i guess if they can retrofit the old m's with digital back, they truly are innovative and can surely be relevant once more...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by khaireen View Post
                              Re: What has happened to LEICA ?

                              I couldn't agree more with the writer.......Like Noordin, I have been a Leicaphile for 30 years. And unlike Noordin, I am not a Digital Leica Rangefinder collector. But I do have both the R and M system.

                              As a diehard user, I 've found that the rangefinder mechanism for the purpose of focussing is very accurate, but slow. And I don't think the mechanism can ever be automated ( auto focussing ) because it has reached its pinnacle of mechanical finesse. Furthermore, the M lenses are all manually rangefinder coupled. I suspect the Leica T is a new 'prototype' mirror less camera system which uses cheaper interchangeable lenses (Made in Japan) and Auto focus via a detachable EVF. The irony is that Leica patented the "Auto Focusing" in early '70's and Konica and Minolta ( Leica's Japanese technology counterpart in 60's, 70's ......) incorporated it and perfected by Nikon and Canon then on. Sony took over the imaging division of Minolta and is now at the forefront of sensor technology.

                              Initially, I would use A7r and A7s as alternative camera to the M when traveling. But, I've grown to like the cameras more and more when it comes to portability and capability. At this juncture, the Leica T is trailing far behind Fuji, Sony and also Olympus in the mirror less realm.

                              [ATTACH]308997[/ATTACH]
                              A portrait of an old Malay Comedian in the '60's, Mat Sentol. Taken with Sony A7s with Zeiss-Sony Fe 55 1.8
                              the pic looks "too digital" for me

                              Comment

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