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  • Yellow Speckled Thrush?

    I took this photo in Fraser Hills last week. I need a confirmation on its name. Sorry the image quality is bad due to poor lighting and heavily cropped.

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  • #2
    Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

    erm.... confusing bird, definitely some intermediate stage, probably a juvenile male proceeding into adulthood but can't quite sure of what?? This looked pretty much like Flycatcher due to the whiskers, I am still puzzled and failed to quite narrow it down, its either an odd stage or coloration mutation of something commoner or a new vagrant?? Need to see comments from other sifus....

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

      Fantail, but not sure which yet.
      No guide with me now.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

        I have seen a picture of a Blue Rock Thrush very similar to this one except the color, everything else including the whisker look the same. So maybe i will call it 'Yellow Rock Thrush"?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

          Originally posted by lutfiali View Post
          I have seen a picture of a Blue Rock Thrush very similar to this one except the color, everything else including the whisker look the same. So maybe i will call it 'Yellow Rock Thrush"?
          It does seemed to shine me the expression of a Blue Rock Thrush but the habitat seemed to be odd, where did you see this exactly? down at Gap Rest House, along the Gap roads or high up on the hill station, if you can give more information on the altitudes its better, this did looked like some variations of a juvenile male "madoci" Blue Rock Thrush, I did not manage to find juvenile "philippensis" that should show orange lower bellies in adult males, which is the more likely form to occur in higher altitudes in Fraser's. There is no such species as "Yellow Rock Thrush", we only have 3 forms here from 2 species, the "madoci" Blue, "philippensis" Blue and White-throated.

          Let's wait until more information is available to us....

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

            I was walking and shooting from the Shahzan Inn on the Fraser Hills toward the paddock, i saw this at the half way distance on the right side of the road opposite the golf course. The growth was quite thick i had to focus in between the shrubs. I know there is not known yellow rock thrush variance but you never know the species that we have not yet discovered in this world.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

              Originally posted by lutfiali View Post
              I was walking and shooting from the Shahzan Inn on the Fraser Hills toward the paddock, i saw this at the half way distance on the right side of the road opposite the golf course. The growth was quite thick i had to focus in between the shrubs. I know there is not known yellow rock thrush variance but you never know the species that we have not yet discovered in this world.
              True, there are species that are not yet known to science, such as a recent new flowerpecker in Sabah, but discovery of a new species often happen in a relatively poorly watched region, Fraser's is being very well watched, probably one of the better watched site in Peninsular Malaysia, its quite unlikely to find something too conspicuous in the open habitats as such. Also we rarely try to describe a new species through a non adult individual found without reasonable distinct features that are unlikely to be found in other potential species.

              Your bird in question shows a plumage that dont seemed to look like one from an adult, rather untidy and without good markings, the plumage itself seemed much to a juvenile plumage for its species, supported by the shape pin-edged feathers at the tail further supports that this is a pretty young juvenile, moulting into a fresh set of tail contours. Furthermore, there are no reasonable odd features that would separate it from the juvenile form of a male Rock Thrush or any other existing species yet, as yellow spots are known in young madoci Blue Rock Thrush, so there isnt much points that will actually support the recommendation of a brand new species, but I think need to check with others, a madoci up to Shahzan might be a little odd for its habitat preference, and if it is a juvenile pandoo or philippensis form of the migrant Blue Rock Thrush, it would be even more valuable as the philippensis is not common and pandoo probably never positively recorded, do hoped you had more shots from difference angles.

              However, from your image, I am not fully confident that you are looking at a Rock Thrush, as I mentioned earlier, your bird had whiskers, not a feature that is commonly seen in the robin allies where the Rock Thrush belongs to although they are a line of flycatcher, it looked more like the Muscicapini tribe of flycatchers, the overall look, without colors, will remind me of a Large Niltava, but the juvenile form is not depicted in the field guide, so I tried to google for some image of the juvenile form, I guess you finally got your answer:

              http://orientalbirdimages.org/search...amily_ID=&p=34

              Sorry to disappoint you that there is no new species here..... But it would be a good example to us how yellowish a young Niltava can be.....

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                Originally posted by jytou View Post
                True, there are species that are not yet known to science, such as a recent new flowerpecker in Sabah, but discovery of a new species often happen in a relatively poorly watched region, Fraser's is being very well watched, probably one of the better watched site in Peninsular Malaysia, its quite unlikely to find something too conspicuous in the open habitats as such. Also we rarely try to describe a new species through a non adult individual found without reasonable distinct features that are unlikely to be found in other potential species.

                Your bird in question shows a plumage that dont seemed to look like one from an adult, rather untidy and without good markings, the plumage itself seemed much to a juvenile plumage for its species, supported by the shape pin-edged feathers at the tail further supports that this is a pretty young juvenile, moulting into a fresh set of tail contours. Furthermore, there are no reasonable odd features that would separate it from the juvenile form of a male Rock Thrush or any other existing species yet, as yellow spots are known in young madoci Blue Rock Thrush, so there isnt much points that will actually support the recommendation of a brand new species, but I think need to check with others, a madoci up to Shahzan might be a little odd for its habitat preference, and if it is a juvenile pandoo or philippensis form of the migrant Blue Rock Thrush, it would be even more valuable as the philippensis is not common and pandoo probably never positively recorded, do hoped you had more shots from difference angles.

                However, from your image, I am not fully confident that you are looking at a Rock Thrush, as I mentioned earlier, your bird had whiskers, not a feature that is commonly seen in the robin allies where the Rock Thrush belongs to although they are a line of flycatcher, it looked more like the Muscicapini tribe of flycatchers, the overall look, without colors, will remind me of a Large Niltava, but the juvenile form is not depicted in the field guide, so I tried to google for some image of the juvenile form, I guess you finally got your answer:

                http://orientalbirdimages.org/search...amily_ID=&p=34

                Sorry to disappoint you that there is no new species here..... But it would be a good example to us how yellowish a young Niltava can be.....
                Thanks for your help. It looks like large niltava juvenile male albeit with yellow color speckles. Thanks for the link, it will help me identify birds in the future.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                  Originally posted by lutfiali View Post
                  Thanks for your help. It looks like large niltava juvenile male albeit with yellow color speckles. Thanks for the link, it will help me identify birds in the future.
                  Rule 1: Always believed that it is known, before drawing conclusion that it may be something new, it could however be a new species for the Malaysian list where it is found elsewhere but the current time (late May) is not a very good time for passage and to get these unexpected vagrants. West Malaysia is quite well watched, chances of getting interestingly new species to science is low, but may happen especially if the species is cryptic (hardly show any distinct features compared to some better known species), a mysterious switftlet had been captured in Ipoh a few years back and its identity is still uncertain but could had been a brand new taxon (a subspecies) that is previously not known to science, too bad no samples are taken for experiments, we can only hope another specimen show up in the future.

                  In Peninsular Malaysia, the better chance of finding something unusual and unknown is to look for them at poorly birder areas with well concealed habitat and rather unique habitat that is likely to create a small population isolation, ideal places to look for includes the highest peaks here, such as the Tahan range (which did gave us a few endemic subspecies at least that survives only around there in the past), Korbu range and some other similar habitats that represents upper montane forests that are untouched and barely explored. Korbu is the poorer studied hill compared to Tahan and will not surprise us with some new discoveries. Brand new species to science that will escape the vast collectors, scientist and birdwatchers are often either cryptic (too similar to a known species), secretive (for instance a nocturnal bird) or else to be so restricted in range until it is barely studied, it could be choosing an extremely limited habitat, like very high altitudes and having poor capability of flight, to escape to nearby regions (for example babblers).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                    Originally posted by jytou View Post
                    Rule 1: Always believed that it is known, before drawing conclusion that it may be something new, it could however be a new species for the Malaysian list where it is found elsewhere but the current time (late May) is not a very good time for passage and to get these unexpected vagrants. West Malaysia is quite well watched, chances of getting interestingly new species to science is low, but may happen especially if the species is cryptic (hardly show any distinct features compared to some better known species), a mysterious switftlet had been captured in Ipoh a few years back and its identity is still uncertain but could had been a brand new taxon (a subspecies) that is previously not known to science, too bad no samples are taken for experiments, we can only hope another specimen show up in the future.




                    In Peninsular Malaysia, the better chance of finding something unusual and unknown is to look for them at poorly birder areas with well concealed habitat and rather unique habitat that is likely to create a small population isolation, ideal places to look for includes the highest peaks here, such as the Tahan range (which did gave us a few endemic subspecies at least that survives only around there in the past), Korbu range and some other similar habitats that represents upper montane forests that are untouched and barely explored. Korbu is the poorer studied hill compared to Tahan and will not surprise us with some new discoveries. Brand new species to science that will escape the vast collectors, scientist and birdwatchers are often either cryptic (too similar to a known species), secretive (for instance a nocturnal bird) or else to be so restricted in range until it is barely studied, it could be choosing an extremely limited habitat, like very high altitudes and having poor capability of flight, to escape to nearby regions (for example babblers).

                    Ya you are right. Those are the areas isolated from Homo Sapiens. Unless i am like Steve Martins in the Big Year, i will not be exploring those grounds anytime soon, got no time, energy and resource to do that kind of things. Birding is to relax my mind not the opposite.

                    Thanks

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                      Originally posted by lutfiali View Post
                      Ya you are right. Those are the areas isolated from Homo Sapiens. Unless i am like Steve Martins in the Big Year, i will not be exploring those grounds anytime soon, got no time, energy and resource to do that kind of things. Birding is to relax my mind not the opposite.

                      Thanks
                      haha, before thinking of finding new species, you must be familiar enough with the existing species first, I am exploring "new" species that are found in my neighbourhood all the time as well, something fun to do as well, will get yourself ready to find something new to the country and probably subsequently, the world?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                        Originally posted by jytou View Post
                        haha, before thinking of finding new species, you must be familiar enough with the existing species first, I am exploring "new" species that are found in my neighbourhood all the time as well, something fun to do as well, will get yourself ready to find something new to the country and probably subsequently, the world?
                        There is a price to pay to be the best birder, in the Big Year the best birder got divorced! ha ha

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                          Originally posted by lutfiali View Post
                          There is a price to pay to be the best birder, in the Big Year the best birder got divorced! ha ha
                          I dont get to watch it, cant find any active source, the movie is not very popular..... haih....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                            Originally posted by jytou View Post
                            I dont get to watch it, cant find any active source, the movie is not very popular..... haih....
                            very funny though..you should watch it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Yellow Speckled Thrush?

                              It may be a Hill Blue Flycatcher - Juve. My wife shot a similar one at Ulu Kali, Genting a few years ago.

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